Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 4GB in Ubuntu Server armhf+raspi3 in Bionic Daily (archived)

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Testcase (Report an issue with this testcase)

This test case is to be carried out on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 4GB.
Follow the installation steps at
IoT installation media

Before booting your CM4 with the new image, edit config.txt on the boot
(1st) partition and uncomment the #dtoverlay=dwc2,dr_mode=host
line to ensure the USB ports on the IO board operate correctly

Immediately after the "rainbow" splash screen, U-Boot starts. Press a key
to interrupt the sequence, then type "boot" to continue it.
Check that the U-Boot prompt (including a two-second wait) appears on
the primary monitor connected to the Pi, that the keyboard will interrupt
the sequence, and that boot successfully concludes after resumption.
During the boot sequence, U-Boot starts interacting via serial (GPIO14
and GPIO15, pins 8 and 10 respectively, on the 40-pin GPIO header). Press
a key to interrupt the sequence, then type "boot" to continue it.
Check that the U-Boot prompt (including a two-second wait) appears on
the attached serial console, that the keyboard will interrupt
the sequence, and that boot successfully concludes after resumption.
Run sudo flash-kernel
Exit code is clean (0) and no error messages are reported
Run sudo reboot
System reboots successfully to a login prompt
Run sudo shutdown -h now
System shuts down in a reasonable time (less than a minute)
Check output of free -h
Reported "Mem" under "total" is consistent with a
Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 4GB. It should be in the region of 3.6-3.8GB.
Perform a large (300-600MB) file copy to USB storage
  • Generate a large (500MB) file: dd if=/dev/urandom of=rubbish
    bs=1M count=500
  • Insert a USB stick (appropriately sized) into a spare USB port
  • Make a mount directory: sudo mkdir /mnt/stick
  • Mount the stick: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/stick
    (modify mount-point as necessary; check sudo dmesg
    output if unsure)
  • Copy the file: sudo cp rubbish /mnt/stick/
  • Unmount the stick: sudo umount /mnt/stick
  • Remove the stick from the USB port
  • Re-insert the stick into the USB port
  • Re-mount the stick: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/stick
    (again, adjust mount-point as necessary)
  • Compare the copied file to that on the stick: cmp rubbish
    /mnt/stick/rubbish
cmp returns 0 and outputs nothing indicating the files are
identical
With an HDMI monitor that supports audio plugged into
the HDMI0 output, and an available MP3 file:
  • Install mpg321 and amixer with sudo apt install mpg321
    alsa-utils
  • Find the correct hardware output for the HDMI0 port:
    cat /proc/asound/cards and note the number at the start
    of the line for the HDMI0 port (usually 0 and possibly
    1 for any connected monitor(s), and 1 or possibly 2 for the headphone
    jack)
  • Attempt to play your MP3 file with: mpg321 -o alsa -a
    hw:num,0 music.mp3
    substituting
    num for the number found during the previous step, and
    music.mp3 for your choice of MP3 file, e.g. mpg321 -o
    alsa -a hw:0,0 "Jeff Wayne - War of the
    Worlds.mp3"
  • Use Ctrl+C to end playback early, if you wish
  • If you cannot hear anything, first check that the mixer's volume is
    not set too low; run alsamixer, and adjust the volume
    (J for down, K for up) before exiting
    (Esc) and retrying playback
Audio can be heard through the device
With an HDMI monitor that supports audio plugged into
the HDMI1 output, and an available MP3 file:
  • Install mpg321 and amixer with sudo apt install mpg321
    alsa-utils
  • Find the correct hardware output for the HDMI1 port:
    cat /proc/asound/cards and note the number at the start
    of the line for the HDMI1 port (usually 0 and possibly
    1 for any connected monitor(s), and 1 or possibly 2 for the headphone
    jack)
  • Attempt to play your MP3 file with: mpg321 -o alsa -a
    hw:num,0 music.mp3
    substituting
    num for the number found during the previous step, and
    music.mp3 for your choice of MP3 file, e.g. mpg321 -o
    alsa -a hw:0,0 "Jeff Wayne - War of the
    Worlds.mp3"
  • Use Ctrl+C to end playback early, if you wish
  • If you cannot hear anything, first check that the mixer's volume is
    not set too low; run alsamixer, and adjust the volume
    (J for down, K for up) before exiting
    (Esc) and retrying playback
Audio can be heard through the device
Check auto-configuration of ethernet
  • Run ip addr
  • Check that a valid IP address is recorded on the eth0 interface
  • Check ping google.com successfully pings a few times
    (Ctrl+C to cancel)
The "eth0" interface should have a DHCP
assigned IP address and you should be able to ping google.com
Configure wifi via netplan
  • Place the following in /etc/netplan/wifi.yaml
    (substituting the SSID and password as necessary):
  •       network:
            version: 2
              wifis:
                wlan0:
                  dhcp4: true
                  access-points:
                    my-ssid-here:
                      password: my-password-here
  • Run sudo netplan apply
  • Wait a few seconds (to allow DHCP to complete), then run ip
    addr
  • Check that a valid IP address is recorded on the wlan0 interface
  • Check ping google.com successfully pings a few times
    (Ctrl+C to cancel)
The "wlan0" interface should have a DHCP
assigned IP address and you should be able to ping google.com

If all actions produce the expected results listed,
please submit a 'passed' result.
If any action fails, or produces an unexpected result,
please submit a 'failed' result and file a bug. Please be sure to include
the bug number when you submit your
result.

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